A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“A friend of wine is a friend of mine” (4/25)
“The first thing on my bucket list is to fill the bucket with wine” (4/24)
“I’m a wine enthusiast. The more wine I drink, the more enthusiastic I become” (4/24)
“Homemade with love. In other words, I licked the spoon and kept using it” (4/24)
“Uncork and unwind” (wine saying) (4/24)
More new entries...

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Entry from January 27, 2007
Clearly Texas (Uvalde slogan)

"Clearly Texas” is the slogan of Uvalde, Texas. The slogan appears on T-shirts and mugs. What it means is not exactly clear.


Handbook of Texas Online
UVALDE, TEXAS. Uvalde is on U.S. highways 90 and 83, State highways 55, 117, and 140, and the Southern Pacific Railroad, eighty-three miles west of San Antonio and seventy miles east of Del Rio in south central Uvalde County. It was founded by Reading W. Black, who settled there in 1853. Black and Nathan L. Stratton operated a ranch on the road between San Antonio and Fort Duncan. By 1854 Black had opened a store, two rock quarries, and a lime kiln; he also prepared a garden and an orchard, repaired nearby roads, and built a permanent home. Black hired Wilhelm C. A. Thielepape as surveyor in May 1855 to lay out a town which he called Encina. The town plan had four central plazas which still existed in 1989. Seminole, Tonkawa, and Lipan-Apache Indian raids and temporary withdrawal of troops from nearby Fort Inge discouraged settlement during the first year. The return of troops to Fort Inge and the community’s proximity to the road connecting San Antonio with the western United States eventually encouraged growth. In 1856 when the county was organized, the town was renamed Uvalde for Spanish governor Juan de Ugalde and was chosen as county seat.

Uvalde Chamber of Commerce
Uvalde Area Chamber of Commerce
“Clearly Texas”

City of Uvalde, Texas
Uvalde has taken on the reputation of the “County of 1,000 Springs,” and it is no mystery that the waterways that run through Uvalde County are crystal clear, giving way to the town slogan of “Clearly, Texas.”

A rare winter freeze in 1989, when temperatures dipped to 6° F, so extensively damaged the county’s winter vegetable crop that Uvalde county judge Bill Mitchell declared the county a disaster area.

In 1990 Uvalde County had a population of 23,340, with 60 percent identified as Hispanic.

Amazon.com
Uvalde: Clearly Texas Mug by Design a Product LLC
Buy new:  $11.95

Uvalde: Clearly Texas T-shirt by SHOPZEUS
Buy new:  $17.95 - $21.95

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Saturday, January 27, 2007 • Permalink