A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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“I’m a wine enthusiast. The more wine I drink, the more enthusiastic I become” (4/24)
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Entry from December 19, 2016
“Christmas: The only time of year where you can sit by a dead tree and eat candy out of socks”

A jocular Christmas saying was printed on Christmas cards by a least December 1986:

“Christmas is just plain weird. What other time of the year do you sit in front of a dead tree in your living room and eat candy out of your sock?”

The saying was made into a jocular definition and posted on Twitter on April 16, 2011:

“Definitions: Christmas (noun) - The only time of the year in which one can sit in front of a dead tree and eat candy out of socks.”

The saying has been printed on many images.


8 December 1986, The News-Journal (Wilmington, DE), “What’s in the cards this year?,” pg. D1, col. 1:
This year, billions of holiday greetings will be delivered all over the world.

All this, in spite of the Scrooge-like message on one of this year’s greeting cards which says, “Christmas is just plain weird. What other time of the year do you sit in front of a dead tree in your living room and eat candy out of your sock?”

21 December 1988, New York (NY) Times, “Zap the Chestnuts and Tune in a Yule Log” by Andrew H, Malcolm, pg. C10, col. 6:
Americans will send more than 2.2 billion greeting cards this year, many with a distinctly contemporary bent. “Christmas is just plain weird,” one message says, “What other time of year do you sit in front of a dead tree in the living room and eat candy out of your socks>“

Google Books
The Great American Christmas Almanac
By Irena Chalmers
New York, NY: Viking Studio Books
1990, ©1988
Pg. 214:
What other time of the year do you sit in front of a dead tree in the living room and eat candy out of your socks?”

Google Books
May All Who Come Behind Us Find Us Faithful
By Bob Russell
Cincinnati, OH: Standard Pub.
1995
Pg. 121:
“Christmas is just plain weird. What other time of the it do you sit in front of a dead tree in your living room and eat candy out of your socks?”

Twitter
hardcorehippiee
‏@angvander
So Christmas is the weirdest hoilday...people sit around a dead tree and eat candy out of socks???!
7:36 PM - 16 Dec 2009

Twitter
Mama Z
‏@jennie_z
Humans are strange. “Remind me again why we sit around a dead tree with lights on it and eat candy and nuts out of socks?” /via @Snowfire11
2:59 PM - 18 Dec 2009

Google Books
Scattered Thoughts From A Scattered Mind
By David Mills
Xlibris Corporations (Xlibris.com)
2011
Pg. 301:
Christmas—what other time of the year do you sit in front of a dead tree and eat candy out of your socks?

Twitter
JJ
‏@fighter419
Definitions: Christmas (noun) - The only time of the year in which one can sit in front of a dead tree and eat candy out of socks
8:46 PM - 16 Apr 2011

Twitter
Josh Warren
‏@warrenjt
Christmas (noun) - The only time of the year in which one can sit in front of a dead tree and eat candy out of socks
1:39 PM - 17 Apr 2011

Google Books
Murder of a Stacked Librarian:
A Scumble River Mystery

By Denise Swanson
New York, NY: Penguin Books
2013
Pg. ?:
“I’m not big on Christmas anyway—I mean, basically it’s sitting in front of a dead tree eating candy out of your socks.” Frannie snickered. 

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Monday, December 19, 2016 • Permalink