A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from March 27, 2013
Catalina Coupon

Catalina Marketing Corporation developed “Catalina” (also “catalina") coupons. When a customer checks out, the cash register examines the customer’s purchases and prints coupons (for use on the customer’s next shopping trip) after the customer’s receipt. The coupons might encourage a customer to buy a larger size of the same product, or to buy a different brand, or to buy complementary products.

The Catalina coupon system was first introduced at a trade show in 1987. “Catalina coupons” has been trademarked by Catalina Marketing Corporation, although the term “Catalina” has been applied by customers to all such post-purchase coupons.


Wiktionary: catalina coupon
Noun
catalina coupon
(plural catalina coupons)
1. A coupon printed after and based on the items purchased at the register.

19 May 1987, The Oregonian (Portland, OR), “Store-printed coupons opposed; Orwellian overtones mentioned” by Christopher H, Schmitt (Knight-Ridder News Service), pg. FD23, col. 1:
At a recent food industry trade show in Chicago, National’s (National Semiconductor Corp.—ed.) Datachecker division is unveiling a new supermarket checkout system. Called the Catalina Coupon $olution, it prints coupons after a shopper’s order is rung, and customers can use the coupons the next time they visit the store. National teamed with Catalina Marketing Corp. of Los Angeles to develop it.

Sound pretty slick, huh? But here’s the rub: The system spits out coupons based on certain trigger items, and it doesn’t necessarily give everybody the same stuff. Using those black-and-white bar codes found on most products today, the system remembers what each shopper buys. Then, based on instruction programmed by the retailer, the system can deliver coupons based on what a person bought—or didn’t buy.

CNNMoney
COMPANIES TO WATCH
By RICHARD S. TEITELBAUM
May 18, 1992
(FORTUNE Magazine) – CATALINA MARKETING
Landfills of America overflow with Sunday newspaper ad inserts, and research shows that shoppers who actually cash in their Tender Vittles coupons are usually the same brand loyalists who would have bought the stuff anyway. Catalina Marketing lets food companies peek at a customer’s shopping habits before they issue coupons—and thus pitch their discounts with surgical precision. How? As a clerk passes groceries over the checkout scanner, bar codes trigger Catalina’s automatic printer, which promptly spits out coupons based on the customer’s purchases. The coupons, handed over with the customer’s change, can be for competing or complementary products: A six-pack of Coke might yield a coupon for Pepsi, a bag of potato chips, or a larger bottle of Coke.

OCLC WorldCat record
Can Catalina cope? - Four years ago it was set to dominate the loyalty market. But have smart cards carved up Catalina’s coupons?
Publisher: London : Haymarket Press, c1968-
Edition/Format: Article : English
Publication: Marketing. (July 25, 1996): 14
Database: ArticleFirst

Eagle-Tribune (North Andover, MA)
May 7, 2010
How ‘Catalina’ coupons help you save
The Coupon Queen

Jill Cataldo
If you’ve shopped for groceries at a large supermarket, you’ve undoubtedly noticed the long “string” of coupons that print out at the register along with your store receipt. These checkout coupons, or “Catalinas,” as coupon shoppers commonly call them, are incredibly valuable to coupon shoppers. (Catalina Marketing Corp. introduced the computer system that issues checkout coupons about 25 years ago, although the company says it’s not sure how or why shoppers picked up on the name.)

Tri-City Herald (Kennewick, WA)
What are ‘Catalina’ coupons?
Published: May 26, 2011
By Jessica Garza, Special to the Herald
PASCO — You may have noticed that when you go to grocery stores you occasionally receive coupons from the cashier that have printed out during your check-out.

Sometimes those coupons are advertisements, but sometimes they are coupons, or even money off your next in-store transaction. The coupons that print out for money off your next in-store transactions are called Catalinas, offered from Catalina Marketing.

(Trademark)
Word Mark CATALINA COUPONS
Goods and Services IC 016. US 002 005 022 023 029 037 038 050. G & S: Coupons. FIRST USE: 20110602. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20110602
IC 035. US 100 101 102. G & S: Promoting the goods and services of others via an interactive web site providing coupons. FIRST USE: 20110602. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20110602
Standard Characters Claimed
Mark Drawing Code (4) STANDARD CHARACTER MARK
Serial Number 85975360
Filing Date August 10, 2010
Current Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1B
Published for Opposition February 1, 2011
Registration Number 4085269
Registration Date January 10, 2012
Owner (REGISTRANT) Catalina Marketing Corporation CORPORATION DELAWARE 200 Carillon Parkway St. Petersburg FLORIDA 33716
Assignment Recorded ASSIGNMENT RECORDED
Attorney of Record Patrick J. Jennings
Disclaimer NO CLAIM IS MADE TO THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHT TO USE “COUPONS” APART FROM THE MARK AS SHOWN
Type of Mark TRADEMARK. SERVICE MARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Live/Dead Indicator LIVE

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWork/Businesses • Wednesday, March 27, 2013 • Permalink