A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from November 26, 2006
Carne Asada (Carne Asado)

Carne asada (or, less frequently written, carne asado) is roasted meat, usually served with peppers and onions. The Mexican dish gained popularity on California and Texas restaurant menus in the 1960s and 1970s.


Google Books
Eats: A Folk History of Texas Foods
by Ernestine Sewell Linck and Joyce Gibson Roach
College Station, TX: TCU Press
2002
Pg. 85:
CARNE ASADA
Carne Asada is nothing more or less than a tenderloin flattenened thin by pounding, seasoned with garlic salt, salt, and pepper, and broiled at 500 degrees or fried in a hot, thick iron pan.

For a typical Mexican platter, serve thin with guacamole, tacos, refried beans, and rice.

About.com"Carne Asada
Carne Asada
From Derrick Riches,
On its most basic level, Carne Asada is a marinated and grilled steak, sliced thin and served on tortillas. This “grilled beef” can be used however you want it, in tacos, burritos or served up straight. The basic method is to marinate most any kind of beef in a lime based marinade. Grill it over a hot fire and then slice into thin strips across the grain. But there is a whole lot more to it than that.
In Mexico and the American Southwest you will find that Carne Asada is the Mexican equivalent of Barbecue. I mean that in the party sense of the word. Traditionally a large fire pit is used to prepare this party but you can use whatever you have. Since everything is prepared over direct heat you don’t need a lid or a fancy grill. The cut of beef you use doesn’t need to be fancy either.

In fact a fairly fatty cut will give you more flavor. Chuck, sirloin or round steaks work great for this. If you are planning on a big party and want to have plenty for everyone plan on about 1 pound of meat per person. Of course, if you have lots of side dishes then cut back on the meat.

Wikipedia: Carne Asada Carne asada is a dish, literally meaning “grilled meat”, it is one of the most popular varieties of Mexican food, more commonly in the Northern parts of Mexico, in the states of Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, Nuevo León and Tamaulipas. It can be found as the main ingredient in tacos, tortas, burritos, or served alone as a meal.

Cooks.com
CARNE ASADA

2 lb. skirt steak
Juice of 2 lemons
2 mashed garlic cloves
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. onion salt
1/2 med. onion, thinly sliced

Marinate steak, thinly sliced, with above ingredients. Place in refrigerator until ready to cook. Drain. Can be broiled or char-broiled.
Serve with beans, rice or for a treat dice radishes, 1/2 red onion, cilantro. Mix with lemon juice and salt.

For zest, dice 1/2 serrano pepper, add to tacos. 

Chef2Chef
Title: Carne Asado (Mexican Style Beef Tips & Gravy)
Yield: 6 Servings
Ingredients
1 lb beef stew meat
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 onion, grated
1 ts cumin, ground
1 ts black pepper, ground
2 cn tomato sauce (or 1 large)
1 granule style beef bouillon
1 flour

Instructions
Sort through stew meat trimming excess fat, gristle. Cut into 1” pcs. if necessary. In med. size, heavy bottom pot, place enough bacon drippings or melted lard to cover bottom. Place stew meat, garlic and onion in pot and saute untill meat is lightly browned. Add water to cover and two or three tbs. beef bouillon, cumin, pepper and tomato sauce. Cover. Simmer on low heat until meat is tender. Toward end of cooking time (abt. 1 hr.) add flour to thicken and continue simmering, stirring from time to time, der additional 10 min. Remove from
heat and serve with spanish rice (Sopa de Arroz) and refried beans. Salsa cruda, Pico de Gallo are good garnishes. Coarsely chopped lettuce and tomatoes and shredded cheddar cheese. Serve with warm flour tortillas, or make soft tacos.

23 March 1929, Wisconsin Rapids (WI) Daily Tribune, pg. 2:
“Sunday is always a day of rest in Havana. All the visitors had to do was to take a country trip to Senor Amancio Gonzales’ farm. He served a light lunch which meant a dish of arroz con pollo, some lechon asado, ajiacco criolo, plantanitos fritos, Carne asada, Frijoles negros, ensalata mixta, and a few bottles of Tropical, Polar, Tovoli, Mumms and other classes of champagne.

19 December 1949, Davenport (Iowa) Democrat and Leader,"Holiday in Mexico” by Ida Bailey Allen, pg. 6:
Main dish: Carne Asada (Roast meat). Usually thin flat beef steaks served with green peppers fried in olive oil, and black beans decorated with bits of fried tortilla and topped with grated cheese.

27 May 1959, New Castle (PA) News, pg. 23:
After we had tried this Carne Asado, as it is called, several times, we tried duplicating the recipe.

9 January 1964, Long Beach (CA) Press-Telegram, pg. B9 ad:
Carne Asada Ranchera
(...)
MORENO’S
3490 Long Beach Boulevard
Long Beach

19 November 1964, Long Beach (CA) Press-Telegram, pg.A27:
I strongly recommend the Carne Asada Ranchera ($3.50), a seared top sirloin steak topped with marvelous steaming Mexican sauce.

11 March 1966, Dallas Morning News, “Dallas After Dark” by Francis Raffetto, section A, pg. 15:
El Fenix, at its new location on McKinney, has a fine “carneasada” (grilled meat) dish.

31 March 1967, Long Beach (CA) Independent, pg. C13:
LET’S HAVE SOME MORE CARNE ASADA.

27 October 1967, Long Beach (CA) Press-Telegram, pg. C13 ad:
CARNE ASADA
(Broiled Sirloin on Salsa a la Mexicana)
This Mexican style steak dinner is most popular with all tourists visiting Central Mexico. These choice graded strips are broiled with a specially prepared salsa made with tomatillos.
(...)
Ashley’s El Encanto

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Sunday, November 26, 2006 • Permalink