A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from December 20, 2010
“Capitalism is the legitimate racket of the ruling class”

"Capitalism is the legitimate racket of the ruling class” is credited to Brooklyn-born gangster Al Capone (1899-1947). The quotation has been cited in print since 2002, but there is no evidence that Capone ever said it.


Wikipedia: Al Capone
Alphonse Gabriel “Al” Capone (January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947) was an Italian-American gangster who led a Prohibition-era crime syndicate. Known as the “Capones”, the group was dedicated to smuggling and bootlegging liquor, and other illegal activities such as prostitution, in Chicago from the early 1920s to 1931.

Born in Brooklyn, New York to Italian immigrants, Capone became involved with gang activity at a young age after being expelled from school at age 14. In his early twenties, he moved to Chicago to take advantage of a new opportunity to make money smuggling illegal alcoholic beverages into the city during Prohibition. He also engaged in various other criminal activities, including bribery of government figures and prostitution. Despite his illegitimate occupation, Capone became a highly visible public figure. He made various charitable endeavors using the money he made from his activities, and was viewed by many to be a “modern-day Robin Hood”.

However, Capone gained infamy when the public discovered his involvement in the Saint Valentine’s Day Massacre, which resulted in the death of seven of Capone’s rival gang members. Capone’s reign ended when he was found guilty of tax evasion, and sent to federal prison. His incarceration included a stay at Alcatraz federal prison. In the final years of Capone’s life, his mental and physical health deteriorated rapidly due to neurosyphilis, a disease which he had contracted several years before. On January 25, 1947, he died from cardiac arrest after suffering a stroke.

Yahoo! Answers
“Capitalism is the legitimate racket of the ruling class"- Al Capone?
I need help on analyzing this quote
What do you think it means?
Best Answer - Chosen by Voters
Some people think that all the world is made up of crooks. Some are legitimate some not. Capitalism is then a form of theft. Taking from the poor and giving to the rich.

Google Groups: alt.quotations
Newsgroups: alt.quotations
From: “simon”
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 15:23:25 -0000
Local: Tues, Jan 29 2002 10:23 am
Subject: Re: There is not a shred of evidence…

“Capitalitism is the legimate racket of the ruling class.”
- Al Capone

Google Groups: rec.arts.tv
Newsgroups: rec.arts.tv
From: Donna L. Bridges
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 12:12:21 -0500
Local: Fri, Feb 8 2002 12:12 pm
Subject: Re: Religious groups want “Boston Public” investigated

“Capitalitism is the legimate racket of the ruling class.” - Al Capone

Google Books
The History of Organized Crime:
The true story and secrets of global gangland

By David Southwell
London: Carlton Books
2006
Pg. 7:
Chicago gang boss Al Capone often claimed he was like any other businessman, saying, “All I do is supply a demand,” and pointing out that, “Capitalism is the legitimate racket of the ruling class”.

Google Books
Stock Trader’s Almanac 2010
By Jeffrey A. Hirsch and Yale Hirsch
Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
2009
Pg. 77:
Capitalism is the legitimate racket of the ruling class. — Al Capone (American gangster, 1899–1947)

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • (0) Comments • Monday, December 20, 2010 • Permalink