A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from June 25, 2013
Arepera or Areperia (place that sells arepas)

An “arepera” or “areperia” is a place (such as a restaurant or a food cart) that sells arepas—corn cakes usually filled with cheese (or other fillings). “Arepera” has been cited in English since at least 1980 and “areperia” since at least 1985.


Google Books
Backpacking in Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador:
Treks in the Northern Andes

By Hilary Bradt, P. Alexander, George Bradt, J. Bundey and S. Coombs
Boston, MA: Chalfont St. Peter: Bradt Enterprises
1980
Pg. 42:
A good Arepera has a selection of eight or so hot fillings to choose from (displayed at the counter so all you have to do is point) and serve the arepas piping hot with butter.

Google Books
The 1986 South American Handbook
Edited by John Brooks
Bath, Eng.: Footprint Handbooks, Ltd.; Lincolnwood, IL: Published in the U.S. by Passport Books
1985
Pg. 793:
The most economical system is to breakfast on fresh orange juice, coffee and a sandwich, arepa or empanada standing at the counter of a pasteleria, panaderia, areperia or fuente de soda.

Google Books
Guide to Venezuela
By Janice Bauman and Leni Young
Caracas, Venezuela?: E. Armitano, Editor
1987
Pg. 823:
arepa, a biscuit-sized griddle cake made of white cornmeal, traditionally served with every Venezuelan meal.
arepera, snack bar where arepas with a large variety of fillings are served.

17 February 1994, Los Angeles (CA) Times, “Arepas Looking for a Few Good Corn Cakes” by Leila Cobo Hanlon, Food part-H, pg. 12:
But, he insists, for the very best white arepas (made from that laboriously hulled dry corn), we had to go to a place-or rather a chain of places-called La Areperia.

21 June 1998, South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL), “Venezuelan Vision: Immigrants start up bakeries, newspapers and other businesses” by Bob French, Community Close-up, pg. 1:
There is now a Venezuelan-American Chamber of Commerce and an areperia, a shop that specializes in making cornmeal arepas, is soon to open in Bonaventure.

Google Books
The South American Table:
The Flavor and Soul of Authentic Home Cooking from Patagonia to Rio de Janeiro

By Maria Baez Kijac
Boston, MA: The Harvard Common Press
2003
Pg. 349:
Areperias are very popular restaurants in Venezuela. They specialize in making arepas (cornbread) with a variety of fillings, such as egg, cheese, chorizo, or highly seasoned ground meat,

Google Books
Saltshaker Spanish - English - Spanish Food and Wine Dictionary
By Dan Perlman
[North Carolina?] : Lulu
2007
Pg. ?:
arepera/arepería - stall selling arepas

New Times (Broward-Palm Beach, FL)
No Recession on Clematis: Downtown WPB Gets Areperia, Pizza Joint
By Bill Citara Wed., Jul. 29 2009 at 6:39 AM
(...)
Arepera (330 Clematis St., 561-820-8011) is sort of Venezuelan sandwich shop featuring the cornmeal cakes that are a national dish. Prices are cheap—all but one arepa are under $5—and they come stuffed with everything from cheese, avocado, and sweet plantains, to roasted pork with tomatoes and garlic sauce.

Orange County Register (Santa Ana, CA)
Published: Feb. 24, 2010 Updated: 2:18 p.m.
Arepas are the specialty at this tiny place
By MARLA JO FISHER / THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
SANTA ANA It’s been seven years since Norah Briceno opened Mil Jugos, her tiny Venezuelan restaurant in downtown Santa Ana, and she’s developed a cult following since then.
(...)
Briceno ran an areperia in her native town of Maracay, Venezuela, where such establishments are gathering places open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Arepera Guacuco (Bushwick, Brooklyn)
About Arepera Guacuco
Arepera Guacuco is a Venezuelan restaurant in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

“Arepera” means “a place that sells arepas,” and Guacuco is the name of a beach in Venezuela where owner Leonardo Molina was born. His mother Carmen is cooking the food at this restaurant, and her arepas are delicious. Arepas are lightly-fried corn patties that are split open and filled with cheese, vegetables or meat.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityRestaurants/Bars/Bakeries/Food Stores • Tuesday, June 25, 2013 • Permalink