A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“I hate it when people pour my cereal. They don’t know how much I want. They don’t know my life” (6/28)
“If I had a dollar for every gender, I’d have two dollars and a lot of counterfeits” (6/28)
“A person with a liberal arts degree walks into a bar…” (bar joke) (6/28)
“You know you’re drunk when you get home, put food in the microwave and then enter your PIN” (6/28)
“A person with an art degree walks into a bar…” (bar joke) (6/28)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from February 23, 2011
Angel Bond

Investopedia defines an “angel bond” as a bond that has a lower interest rate because of the issuing company’s high credit rating. “Angel bonds” are said to be the opposite of “fallen angels”—formerly solid companies ("angels") that have dropped ("fallen") precipitously in price.

Citations for “angel bond” have been very rare and mainly quote the Investopedia definition (from 2010). It is not possible to say when “angel bond” was coined, or even that it is a legitimate term, because of the lack of legitimate citations.


Investopedia
What Does Angel Bond Mean?
Investment-grade bonds that pay a lower interest rate because of the issuing company’s high credit rating. Angel bonds are the opposite of fallen angels, which are bonds that have been given a “junk” rating, and are therefore much more risky. 

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • (0) Comments • Wednesday, February 23, 2011 • Permalink